Thomas Moore Statue

This bronze bust of the Irish poet Thomas Moore (1779–1852) by sculptor Dennis B. Sheahan, was dedicated in Central Park in 1880. Thomas Moore, born of humble origins in Dublin, Ireland, demonstrated precocious abilities in acting, singing, and writing verse. By the time he was admitted to Trinity College in 1794, he was already a published poet. In 1800, his translation of Odes of Anacreon brought him critical acclaim.

In 1801, under the pseudonym Thomas Little, he published a series of love poems. Appointed admiralty registrar of Bermuda in 1803, he returned two years later to England after visits to the United States and Canada. He went on to have a prolific career as a poet and author of lyric songs, notably the Irish Melodies, published intermittently between 1808 and 1834, and National Airs (1818-1827). He also published a history of Ireland (1827) and a biography of Lord Byron (1830), and penned satirical pieces on contemporary society such as The Two Penny Postbag (1813) and The Fudge Family in Paris (1818).

The Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, a citizens group of Irish descent, commissioned this statue of Moore. This bust of Moore was unveiled in 1880 on the 101st anniversary of the poet’s birth. Another statue of the writer by John G. Draddy was installed the previous year in Prospect Park. In 1993, the Central Park Conservancy Sculpture Conservation Program conserved the statue, and in 2000-2001 the surrounding landscape and pond area were renovated.