Shakespeare Garden

Take a virtual look around Central Park’s Shakespeare Garden on a beautiful Fall afternoon!

Loaded Cannon Found In New York’s Central Park

New York (CNN) — This could have caused a major blast from the past.

Workers cleaning a cannon, last fired more than 200 years ago, were shocked to find Friday that it was still loaded with gunpowder, wadding and a cannonball.

The preservation workers from New York’s Central Park Conservancy were removing rust from the antique cannon, which once fired munitions aboard the British warship HMS Hussar, when they made the explosive discovery, New York police Detective Brian Sessa said.

Dena Libner, a spokeswoman for the Central Park Conservancy, said the workers found the munitions after removing a concrete plug from the mouth of the cannon.

Workers immediately called 911, and technicians determined that the gunpowder was still active.

Authorities removed about 1.8 pounds of black gunpowder from the scene and took it to a gun range for disposal, the detective said.

Libner said the cannon was a gift from an anonymous donor to the city in 1865 and was stored for a period of time because of vandalism concerns.

It is now part of the organization’s restoration program, she said.

“We silenced British cannon fire in 1776, and we don’t want to hear it again in Central Park,” New York police said in a statement to CNN affiliate WCBS.

The loaded artillery piece was one of two Revolutionary War-era cannons being stored at the park’s Ramble shed, near the 79th Street transverse, according to the affiliate.

“This was an amazing surprise,” John Moore, author of the upcoming book “The Secrets of Central Park,” told WCBS. “It was there for so many years, and people were sitting on it when it was a loaded cannon.”

The Hussar sank in November 1780, according to the New York Journal of American History.

 

Freak fish is set to invade New York’s Central Park

New York City officials are worried that a freaky air-breathing, land-walking (supposedly), invasive species of fish is set to invade Central Park’s waterways, potentially wreaking havoc on the local ecosystems.
The fish is commonly called the snakehead fish and it is a dangerous invasive species. The ugly but successful predator has local environmental officials worried.
The northern snakehead (Channa argus) can grow three feet long, can breathe air, eats ravenously, and lays masses of eggs in just a few days.
Some claim, though others disagree, that this aggressive predator can even wriggle on the ground, effectively making them a dangerous puddle-jumper that can move between lakes.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/invasive-snakehead-fish-in-central-park-2013-4#ixzz2SMOq1ThS

Central Park, New York – Fall Blooms in the Conservatory Garden

Conservatory Garden

Conservatory Garden

One of the hidden wonders of Central Park is the Conservatory Garden at Fifth Avenue and 105th St. A secluded oasis, just a few steps down from one of the City’s busiest thoroughfares; the garden offers a fragrant respite from the gasp and clatter of the urban afternoon.  And, while spring may be a spectacular time to visit the Garden, autumn puts on its own brilliant show when more than 2,000 Korean chrysanthemums bloom in the North Garden. They’re peaking now, and scheduled to be on view through Wednesday, November 10.  Blooming in shades of burgundy, pink, white and apricot, the mums have been part of the Garden’s planting design for decades.

The Conservatory Garden is open daily from 8:00 am to dusk. Enter east side from 104th to 106th Streets, at Fifth Avenue and 105th Street, or through the 106th Street gate inside the Park.

Korean Chrysanthemums