Central Park - Page 2 of 80 - The Complete Guide to New York's Central Park

Central Park’s Literary Walk to Feature Women’s Suffrage Monument

For the first time in history, a bronze statue depicting and celebrating the achievements of women will join the myriad monuments honoring men, animals and fictional characters in the storied park.

On Monday, city officials unveiled the site on the Literary Walk in the south end of the park where it plans to place the “Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony Woman Suffrage Movement Monument” in 2020. The tree-lined mall includes statues of writers such as William Shakespeare and Robert Burns. Until now the only monuments depicting females in the park are Alice in Wonderland, Mother Goose, Juliet (from Romeo and Juliet) and a variety of nymphs and other mystical creatures.

Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, a long-time supporter of the statue, said it was important to place it in Central Park as opposed to another site in the city.

“About 42 million people use Central Park,” said Brewer, who secured $100,000 in city funds for the statue. “This is a place of education. And this is history not always being taught.”

Stanton and Anthony were passionate about the abolition of slavery and the right of women to vote. They both had strong ties to New York, and in 1866 Stanton became the first woman to run for Congress. The fierce pair founded the National Woman Suffrage Association in 1869.

. . . → Read More: Central Park’s Literary Walk to Feature Women’s Suffrage Monument

Giant Space Bubble Descends on Central Park

In celebration of the 50th anniversary of Art in the Parks, Spacebuster, in partnership with the Storefront for Art & Architecture, is bringing its pop-up exhibition, New Icon-i-Cities, to Central Park on Saturday, October 21 from 11 am to 3 pm.

The exhibition will bring audiences inside Spacebuster, a van outfitted with an expanding inflatable bubble that houses up to 120 people. It is an extension of the Storefront’s current installation, Souvenirs: New New York Icons, which is comprised of original work by 59 artists to “represent and redefine the collective imagery for each of New York City’s 59 communities.”

According to a press release, New Icon-i-Cities aims to “bring together critical approaches to the shifting and complex iconography of the city.” By bringing this bubble to Central Park, participants will have the opportunity to attend a series of talks and a workshops in a unique space, inspiring visitors to perceive New York differently.

Spacebuster is all about allowing visitors to present their ideas on what constitutes an icon of the city today. Project creator, raumlaborberlin, wants New Yorkers to “produce their own iconography for their neighborhoods.”

Photo courtesy of Channel V Media

This event also combines ideas from We Like America, an experimental Spacebuster road trip that traveled America’s Rust Belt to transform public spaces into impromptu community zones.

This multifaceted collaboration comes together in celebration of Art in the Parks, an initiative by the New York City Parks Department that allows artists to transform the city’s public spaces . . . → Read More: Giant Space Bubble Descends on Central Park

ILLYRIA – the story of Joe Papp and Shakespeare in Central Park

It is 1958, and New York City is in the midst of a major building boom; a four-lane highway is planned for the heart of Washington Square; Carnegie Hall is designated for demolition; entire neighborhoods on the West Side are leveled to make room for a new “palace of art.” And a young Joe Papp and his colleagues face betrayals, self-inflicted wounds, and anger from the city’s powerful elite as they continue their free Shakespeare productions in Central Park.

From the creator of the most celebrated family plays of the last decade comes a drama about a different kind of family – one held together by the simple and incredibly complicated belief that the theater, and the city, belong to all of us.

In addition to the Free First Preview, a limited number of free tickets for all performances except for opening night will be distributed in the lobby of The Public beginning 90 minutes prior to each scheduled performance, and will continue, while supplies last, up to the posted curtain time. An additional number of free tickets will be offered through TodayTix, furthering the mission of making great theater accessible to all.

Anspacher Theater October 22 – December 10 Preview Members (10/22-10/30): $50

Preview Members (All other dates): $75

Members: start at $50

Non-Members: start at $75 plus fees

For information on day of show lottery tickets, student tickets, group tickets & more, click here. Click here for more information on how to access American Express® Preferred Seating and . . . → Read More: ILLYRIA – the story of Joe Papp and Shakespeare in Central Park

Pelleas et Melisande at the Swedish Cottage Theater in Central Park

City Parks Foundation’s Swedish Cottage Marionette Theatre and SummerStage Festival present Pelleas et Melisande this weekend – a commissioned, site-specific work directed, choreographed, and designed by Luca Veggetti. A theatrical puppet experience that tells the story of doomed love based on Maurice Maeterlinck’s symphonic poem. Set to a composition by Arnold Schoenberg, the audience is taken on a journey of love and its consequences told through puppetry.

We caught the initial performance Wednesday evening and it was a magically evocative combination of puppetry, choreography and stage production. It is a very special piece that should not be missed – and one which happily demonstrates the possibilities that a brilliant imagination and inspired performances can bring to the iconic theater. We look forward to more “adult oriented” production in the future.

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