Shakespeare in the Park 2019

We’re looking forward to another amazing season of Free Shakespeare in the Park at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park.  What better way to spend a warm, summer evening than enjoying Othello, Julius Caesar, or Hamlet performed outdoors at the very heart of Manhattan?  All performances take place at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park rain or shine.

Free Tickets

Free tickets to MUCH ADO NOTHING, CORIOLANUS, and HERCULES will be distributed on each performance day by waiting on line at select distribution points in the five boroughs as well as in Central Park. An in person lottery is held in the lobby of The Public Theater at 425 Lafayette St and a digital lottery is hosted through Today Tix, all summer long. Check back later in the spring for a detailed schedule of our borough distribution dates as well as additional details.

Much Ado About Nothing

Tony Award winner Kenny Leon (American SonA Raisin in the Sun) directs a bold new take on Shakespeare’s cherished comedy of romantic retribution and miscommunication, MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING. In this modern production, we find the community of Messina celebrating a break from an ongoing war. But not all is peaceful amid the revelry, as old rivals engage in a battle of wits, unexpected foes plot revenge, and young lovers are caught in a tumultuous courtship – until love proves the ultimate trickster, and undoes them all.

Coriolanus

Then, for the first time since 1979, Free Shakespeare in the Park presents CORIOLANUS, the Bard’s blistering drama about a general voted into power by a populace hungry for change, and the unraveling that follows. Tony Award winner Daniel Sullivan (Proof, Shakespeare In The Park’s Troilus and Cressida) directs a modern-day version of this riveting epic of democracy and demagoguery. Begins July 16

Hercules

The Public Theater’s initiative that invites communities across New York to create ambitious works of participatory theater is closing out the summer in truly epic fashion. Public Works will present the glorious story of HERCULES, brought to vibrant life by professional actors and community groups from across the city. Directed by Public Works founder and Resident Director Lear deBessonet, this summer’s production, based on the Disney animated film, will feature the film’s beloved score, plus additional original songs by the film’s composer Alan Menken and lyricist David Zippel, with a new book by Kristoffer Diaz and choreography by Chase Brock.  Journey with Hercules in this new stage adaptation that invites New Yorkers from all five boroughs to participate in a joyous musical that celebrates the heroes found in all of us.

Marble Arch – Lost Bridge of Central Park

Marble Arch – loveliest of the “Lost Bridges of Central Park“. It was once located at the latitude of 66th Street, providing a crossing under the Drive, with a stairway up to the southern entrance of the Mall. It was demolished in 1938, a victim of Robert Moses’ automobile-centric vision of 20th century New York City.

Clarence Cook wrote of this graceful underpass in A Description of the New York Central Park, published in 1869:

This is one of the pleasantest and most elegantly built of all these cool places for rest and refreshment. It is entered at one end of a level with a foot path; at the other a double stairway to the left and right leads to the level of the Mall and to the carriage-road which this archway is designed to carry. It is called the marble archway to distinguish it, all other structures of this sort in the Park being built either of stone, or brick, or of brick and stone combined. The marble employed is the coarse limestone from the Westchester quarries. . . . A marble bench runs along each side, and at the end . . . a semicircular niche accommodates those who prefer the fuller light that reaches from the stairway. In this niche there is to be placed a suitable marble basin with drinking cups, but, present water is obtained from a common hydrant. The interior of this archway is peculiarly light and attractive, and far more cheerful than other . . . → Read More: Marble Arch – Lost Bridge of Central Park

Winter Jam 2019!

Time again to enjoy all the fun of a ski weekend in the Catskills right in Central Park! The Parks Department reminds us why we should love the colder months thanks to Winter Jam, its annual winter sports festival in Central Park. Families can learn or take part in snowshoeing, skiing and sledding. Bring your own snow sports gear or borrow the equipment on load at no cost, then while away the hours sipping hot chocolate and enjoying the outdoors during this ultimate snow day. The rain date for the 2019 event is Feb 2. Enter the park at 72nd St, as the festivities will take place in the Bandshell area. All ages.

Saturday, January 26, 2019* 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Central Park Bandshell Area Enter at 72nd Street *Rain Date: February 2, 2019

Presented by NYC Parks, the Olympic Regional Development Authority, I Love NY, and I Ski NY, Winter Jam is a free winter sports festival for New Yorkers of all ages! Our partners at Gore Mountain will blow lots of snow in the heart of Manhattan, creating an urban snow field for all to enjoy!

Featured Venues Lake Placid Snow Field Learn to Ski Sledding Hill Live Ice Carving Ice Sculpture Garden

Please note: Activity lines are subject to close early, so come early!

Participants in the Learn to Ski and Sledding activities must sign a waiver and provide photo identification before participating in any of these activities. The waivers will be provided at the event. . . . → Read More: Winter Jam 2019!

Post Apocalyptic Central Park

An international design competition was launched last April LA+Journal that charged artists, architects, planners, and designers with reimagining and redesigning New York’s Central Park for the 21st century. There were 382 entrants from 30 different countries, with a total of 193 designs. In the end it was five entries submitted from Australia, China, the United Kingdom, and the United States that won. Each of the winners will receive a $4,000 cash prize and publication in LA+Journal’s LA+ICONOCLAST issue. The ICONOCLAST Design Competition, as it was called, was inspired by a hypothetical eco-terrorist attack carried out in protest to the loss of the world’s forests. Through this scenario, the design competition provokes artists to “tackle big questions about how we represent and manifest ideals of public health, democracy, and nature.” You can view the extraordinary winners here.

Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade Viewing

Time for the 92nd Thanksgiving Day Parade and all the insane fun of watching it live from the streets of Manhattan. Here are some tips on the best vantage points along the route as it marches around Central Park – and a link to Macy’s official Parade Route Page.

Central Park West — if you’re an early bird Each year, Central Park West between 59th and 75th streets is filled with excited parade viewers before most people have gotten out of bed. Macy’s says people will start lining up along this section of the parade route at 6 a.m.

Columbus Circle Head up to the second and third floors of the Shops at Columbus Circle for an elevated — and warmer — view of the parade.

Central Park South at Sixth Avenue The intersection of Central Park South and Sixth Avenue is another spot with several vantage points. It also offers a great view of the parade as it heads south toward Herald Square.

Sixth Avenue between West 59th and 38th streets Macy’s suggests parade viewers stay above 38th Street; the closer you get to Herald Square, the less space there will be for the public.

Worst spots for viewing: 77th Street and Central Park West: The start of the parade offers little to no public viewing options. Sixth Avenue between 34th and 38th streets: The national television broadcast limits space in this area. 34th Street between Sixth and Seventh avenues: The national television broadcast limits space in this . . . → Read More: Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade Viewing