Post Apocalyptic Central Park

An international design competition was launched last April LA+Journal that charged artists, architects, planners, and designers with reimagining and redesigning New York’s Central Park for the 21st century.  There were 382 entrants from 30 different countries, with a total of 193 designs.  In the end it was five entries submitted from Australia, China, the United Kingdom, and the United States that won. Each of the winners will receive a $4,000 cash prize and publication in LA+Journal’s LA+ICONOCLAST issue. The ICONOCLAST Design Competition, as it was called, was inspired by a hypothetical eco-terrorist attack carried out in protest to the loss of the world’s forests. Through this scenario, the design competition provokes artists to “tackle big questions about how we represent and manifest ideals of public health, democracy, and nature.”  You can view the extraordinary winners here.

Arsenal Gallery: 35th Annual Wreath Interpretations Exhibition


NYC Parks welcomes the holiday season with its 35th annual exhibition of creative, unconventional wreaths. Employing an array of uncommon materials, more than 40 participating fine artists, designers, and imaginative individuals celebrate this timeless holiday symbol. This year’s wreaths draw inspiration from a range of themes ranging from the personal to the universal. This exhibition is an inspired and fun way to experience the holiday season.
Thursday, December 7, 2017

9:00 a.m.5:00 p.m.
This event repeats every weekday between 12/7/2017 and 1/5/2018.

Arsenal in Central Park
830 Fifth Avenue
Manhattan

Cost – Free

Contact Number

(212) 360-8114

Contact Email

artandantiquities@parks.nyc.gov

Arsenal Gallery Exhibition Opening: The Rhythmic Art of Thread

The Rhythmic Art of Thread showcases works in fiber that explore diverse themes of culture, spirituality, historical events, and icons. Contemporary artists merge techniques of quilting, applique, mixed media, screening, fabric collage, and fiber fusion to tell stories and present abstract imagery in textile art. The exhibition features the works of Michael A. Cummings, Shimoda Emanuel, Ife Felix, Laura R. Gadson, Jacqueline Johnson, Jackquelynn Jones, Dindga McCannon, Lisa Shepard Stewart, and 2016 Teen Curators of The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.

Curated by Harlem Needle Arts with support from NYC Parks’ Ebony Society.

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

6:00 p.m.8:00 p.m.

Location

Arsenal in Central Park
830 Fifth Avenue
Manhattan

Directions to this location
Location Details:
The gallery is located on the third floor.

Cost

Free

Event Organizer

Art & Antiquities, Harlem Needle Arts, NYC Parks Ebony Society

Contact Number

(212) 360-8163

Contact Email

artandantiquities@parks.nyc.gov

Arsenal Gallery Exhibition: Wreath Interpretations

582b71aaaa6eeCelebrate the holiday season with the 34th annual exhibition of inventive, unconventional wreaths crafted by a diverse selection of more than 40 fine artists, designers, and other creative contributors. Enlivening this timeless holiday symbol, the participating artists employ a variety of unusual materials like beer cans, eyeglasses, kitchen utensils, and gardening tools to examine themes ranging from climate change to family heritage. This exhibition is an imaginative and fun way to experience the holiday season.

9:00 a.m.5:00 p.m.

Every weekday between 12/7/2016 and 1/5/2017 .

This event is free and open to the public.

Location

Arsenal in Central Park
830 Fifth Avenue
Manhattan

Directions to this location
Location Details:
Third floor gallery

Cost

Free

Event Organizer

Art & Antiquities

Contact Number

(212) 360-8114

Contact Email

artandantiquities@parks.nyc.gov

PsychoBarn

Last weeks for this amazing installation on the roof of the Met.  A large-scale sculpture by acclaimed British artist Cornelia Parker, inspired by the paintings of Edward Hopper and by two emblems of American architecture—the classic red barn and the Bates family’s sinister mansion from Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 film Psycho—comprises the fourth annual installation of site-specific works commissioned for The Met’s Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden.

Nearly 30 feet high, the sculpture is fabricated from a deconstructed red barn and seems at first to be a genuine house, but is in fact a scaled-down structure consisting of two facades propped up from behind with scaffolding. Simultaneously authentic and illusory, Transitional Object (PsychoBarn) evokes the psychological associations embedded in architectural spaces. It is set atop The Met, high above Central Park—providing an unusual contrast to the Manhattan skyline.